Now Playing Tracks

transitiontransmission:

Kristen Beck is continuing her crusade to make openly transgender service members in the US a reality.  Today she posted this photocopy of a letter that she received earlier this month.  Attached wit this letter, she also had a few words to share:

___

Letter from the SECDEF on Transgender service. I have sent letters and met with STAFF.

There are approx 700,000 transgender Americans alive today… can’t we get 10% of them to take 5min to help bring EQUALITY?

Sign/Share the petition to show that we have a voice… write a cool comment in the petition.


https://www.change.org/petitions/secretary-of-defense-chuck-hagel-the-u-s-department-of-defense-allow-transgender-persons-to-serve-in-the-armed-forces

____

We’d like to salute Kristen, and are proud to resend her message to our listeners, and readers.

-The Transgender Trio

"Should parents read their daughter's texts or monitor her online activity for bad language and inappropriate content?"

daeranilen:

daeranilen:

Earlier today, I served as the “young woman’s voice” in a panel of local experts at a Girl Scouts speaking event. One question for the panel was something to the effect of, "Should parents read their daughter’s texts or monitor her online activity for bad language and inappropriate content?"

I was surprised when the first panelist answered the question as if it were about cyberbullying. The adult audience nodded sagely as she spoke about the importance of protecting children online.

I reached for the microphone next. I said, “As far as reading your child’s texts or logging into their social media profiles, I would say 99.9% of the time, do not do that.”

Looks of total shock answered me. I actually saw heads jerk back in surprise. Even some of my fellow panelists blinked.

Everyone stared as I explained that going behind a child’s back in such a way severs the bond of trust with the parent. When I said, “This is the most effective way to ensure that your child never tells you anything,” it was like I’d delivered a revelation.

It’s easy to talk about the disconnect between the old and the young, but I don’t think I’d ever been so slapped in the face by the reality of it. It was clear that for most of the parents I spoke to, the idea of such actions as a violation had never occurred to them at all.

It alarms me how quickly adults forget that children are people.

Apparently people are rediscovering this post somehow and I think that’s pretty cool! Having experienced similar violations of trust in my youth, this is an important issue to me, so I want to add my personal story:

Around age 13, I tried to express to my mother that I thought I might have clinical depression, and she snapped at me “not to joke about things like that.” I stopped telling my mother when I felt depressed.

Around age 15, I caught my mother reading my diary. She confessed that any time she saw me write in my diary, she would sneak into my room and read it, because I only wrote when I was upset. I stopped keeping a diary.

Around age 18, I had an emotional breakdown while on vacation because I didn’t want to go to college. I ended up seeing a therapist for - surprise surprise - depression.

Around age 21, I spoke on this panel with my mother in the audience, and afterwards I mentioned the diary incident to her with respect to this particular Q&A. Her eyes welled up, and she said, “You know I read those because I was worried you were depressed and going to hurt yourself, right?”

TL;DR: When you invade your child’s privacy, you communicate three things:

  1. You do not respect their rights as an individual.
  2. You do not trust them to navigate problems or seek help on their own.
  3. You probably haven’t been listening to them.

Information about almost every issue that you think you have to snoop for can probably be obtained by communicating with and listening to your child.

pybooty:

Coming Out Simulator 2014 - a half-true game about half-truths

Coming Out Simulator is exactly what it says it is. It’s a free-to-play conversation simulator based on/inspired by the personal story of coming out of its creator, Nicky Case.

There’s no easy answer in Coming Out Simulator, no optimal ending to be achieved if you collect the requisite amount of points. Case based the game off a pivotal moment in his own life as a teenager. And just like in real life, the moment of “coming out” in this game is traumatic no matter which way the player chooses to approach it.

Ultimately, it’s liberating as well. But that’s not what the brunt of the experience playing Coming Out Simulator is actually like. […] There’s power in exploring a fantasy like the one in Mass Effect 3, but there’s also power in being reminded that “coming out” the way one does in that game is a fantasy, and a pretty far-fetched one for many people who faced far more difficult challenges when they actually came out.

Coming Out Simulator is a game about that second experience. It’s a painful one. But it’s also a necessary one, that I think more people who’ve never had to struggle with their own sexual identity should see for themselves. 

this game made me cry omfg

(Source: peterquills)

fuckyeahmtfs:

Businesses That Offer at Least One Transgender-Inclusive Health Care Coverage Plan

So I know the HRC is pretty damn shitty to us trans folk. But this is still the best comprehensive thing I have seen with employers that offer trans* inclusive benefits. 

I set a click through link to a high resolution.

A lot of these are worth a Google to find out what they really are. Like Darden Restaurants, that’s Olive Garden and Red Lobster. 

If you can get a full-time job at one of these places, they will (most likely) offer GRS/SRS in the insurance plan. If you take a look here, you can see what companies have what restrictions about it. Eg, age, time on hormones, ‘real life experience’, all that bs.

Hopefully this will help some of you get jobs at places that will actually do you some good.

For the rest of the Corporate Equality Index, look here.

Please reblog this at the least, even if you don’t care, your friends or fellow trans people might.

To Tumblr, Love Pixel Union